dabestredur:

a-blog-you-follow:

Dude! This place would be so cool to explore.

it also looks like a horrible place to die

(Source: kittycatmoon, via madotsuki)

myampgoesto11:

Wooden artwork by Cha Jong Rye

(via fuckyeahartandscience)

ianbrooks:

Dancing Dead Leaves by Yunfan Tan

Have you ever danced with the devil by the pale moonlight? Batman has, but surely the fallen leaves that have given their lives annually for a few thousand millennia know that feel as well, though Yunfan believes that need not be a saddening sacrifice: looping the withering process and turning it into an endless dance, the leaves’ way of saying this isn’t goodbye… just we’ll do this again next year.

Artist: Behance / Tumblr / Linkedin

(via fuckyeahartandscience)

sosuperawesome:

Frozen Bubbles Suspended Below Abraham Lake

Abraham Lake has become world famous, especially amongst photographers. The artificial lake, which lies in the foothills of the Canadian Rockies, is home to a rare phenomenon where bubbles get frozen right underneath its surface. They’re often referred to as ice bubbles or frozen bubbles.

What causes this to happen? As photographer Fikret Onal explains, “The plants on the lake bed release methane gas and methane gets frozen once coming close enough to much colder lake surface and they keep stacking up below once the weather gets colder and colder during [the] winter season.”

Though a gorgeous sight, this incredible destination isn’t for the weak or the weary. “Even though I’ve walked on a frozen lake before, Abraham Lake made me feel completely uneasy since the lake was not covered with snow,” says Onal. “Even though the icy surface was around 8-9 inches thick, it still scared the hell out of me, not only because of the fact that I could see all the cracks…and the darkness of the lake bottom through the glassy surface, but also [because of] the deep boomy, cracking sounds coming from underneath the lake’s surface.”

Click through for image sources.

(via fuckyeahartandscience)

exploratorium:

In this visualization seismic waves from small earthquakes are captured as they propagate across Long Beach CA by a 5300 pixel array of seismometers  spaced 100m apart.
 The array was built to look beneath the earth for oil bearing strata, but the company released this data to local geology professors who turned it into a movie to help us all understand how seismic waves propagate. The movie shows the waves moving in real time, and then slowed down by 1/2.
-Dr. Paul Dohery, Exploratorium Senior Scientist
(via Watch the ground ripple in Long Beach « The Trembling Earth)

exploratorium:

In this visualization seismic waves from small earthquakes are captured as they propagate across Long Beach CA by a 5300 pixel array of seismometers  spaced 100m apart.


The array was built to look beneath the earth for oil bearing strata, but the company released this data to local geology professors who turned it into a movie to help us all understand how seismic waves propagate. The movie shows the waves moving in real time, and then slowed down by 1/2.

-Dr. Paul Dohery, Exploratorium Senior Scientist

(via Watch the ground ripple in Long Beach « The Trembling Earth)

(Source: bbbraket, via yuriyurarararayuruyuridaijiken)

sagansense:

Yearlong Space Missions Will Present Physical and Mental Challenges

image 1: This picture of the International Space Station and the moon was photographed from the space shuttle Atlantis just after the two spacecraft undocked on July 19, 2011, during NASA’s final shuttle mission STS-135.
image 2: Expedition 26 Commander Scott Kelly wears a blue wrist band that has a peace symbol, a heart and the word “Gabby” to show his love of his sister-in-law U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords as he rests shortly after he and cosmonauts Oleg Skripochka and Alexander Kaleri landed in their Soyuz TMA-01M capsule in Kazakhstan on March 16, 2011.
image 3: Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, Expedition 23 flight engineer, is pictured near fresh tomatoes floating freely in the Unity node of the International Space Station in May 2010.

NASA is getting ready to send astronauts on yearlong missions to the International Space Station, doubling the duration of a typical orbital stay. These long-term missions will be sending spaceflyers into largely uncharted territory, and some of the biggest unknowns are how the human mind and body will react to that much time in space.

NASA has long known that weightlessness wreaks havoc on the body, with astronauts losing muscle mass and bone density, and even suffering eyesight degeneration, after spending time in space.

“While it’s definitely new territory for NASA, I wouldn’t expect the challenges of a yearlong mission to be substantially different from those of a six-month mission,” said former space station commander Michael Lopez-Alegria, who is now president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation. “A yearlong mission will be beneficial to Human Research Program scientists as they continue to expand the envelope of human spaceflight so that one day we can undertake the longer missions that we think will be necessary to voyage beyond cis-lunar space,” or the region between Earth and the moon.

Another health risk associated with spaceflight is radiation: Beyond the protective confines of Earth’s atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to potentially dangerous radiation from the sun, and the longer they spend in space, the more radiation they receive.

And the health risks are just one side of the challenge. Psychologically, the isolation and confinement of life on the space station can be tough to deal with as well.

Though exercise machines installed on the space station can mitigate the body issues, and phone calls and emails home can help the mind, both of these problems should be more severe for crews spending twice the normal mission length in orbit.

“For the crew, the biggest challenge would be psycho-social,” another former space station commander, Leroy Chiao, wrote in an email. “It is difficult to be away for a long period of time. Fortunately, the ISS features excellent communication tools for crews to keep in touch with friends and loved ones.”

Though some cosmonauts spent a year or longer on previous space missions to the Russian Mir station, no one has ever lived for a year at the International Space Station. The first ISS yearlong crew will be NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, who are due to launch in 2015.

Kelly, a former U.S. Navy test pilot with combat experience, said he thinks he’s up to the challenge.

“We have a really good group of people here, the behavioral health and performance group, that works with us to try to mitigate the psychological impact of being away from home and isolated for a long time,” Kelly told SPACE.com during an interview earlier this month. “I kind of recognize what I need in that regard and what I can do to make it better.”

And as for the risk to his bodily health, Kelly said he’s prepared to take it on.

“I’m not a big worrier, but I certainly understand that there is more risk,” he said. “But in anything I’ve done throughout my career — flying aircraft as a test pilot — there’s risk and reward, and you have to weigh the risks, and I think it’s worth it.”

(via exploratorium)

onthesideoftheotters:

tubaplaysmatt:

they made something worse than crocs omg



now, croc pants

onthesideoftheotters:

tubaplaysmatt:

they made something worse than crocs omg

image

now, croc pants

(Source: memewhore, via executiveotaku)

Once ler, forever a ler

Once ler, forever a ler

(Source: cowboy--dan, via madotsuki)

travelingcolors:

Paris-based art director-turn-photographer Laurent Chéhère has created a series of whimsical photographs featuring buildings that appear to be flying. Inspired by “Le Ballon Rouge”—a 1956 French children’s short film—the part-analog and part-digital images are rendered in the same muted post-war color palette as the film.

Reminded me of this manga

(via travelingcolors)